Post Disaster Needs Assessment Report
A swollen Mao Chhu after the floods with the broken spur wall in the background (circled).

Post Disaster Needs Assessment

Published on:November 24, 2016

Post Disaster Needs Assessment

Commitment to Action: Moving from delivering aid to ending need
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Press Release: (Istanbul, 24 May 2016) – UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and the heads of UNICEF, UNHCR, WHO, OCHA, WFP, FAO, UNFPA and UNDP, with the endorsement of the World Bank and the International Organization for Migration, launched yesterday a “Commitment to Action” in which they agreed to put in place a new way of […]

Published on:May 25, 2016

Press Release: (Istanbul, 24 May 2016) – UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and the heads of UNICEF, UNHCR, WHO, OCHA, WFP, FAO, UNFPA and UNDP, with the endorsement of the World Bank and the International Organization for Migration, launched yesterday a “Commitment to Action” in which they agreed to put in place a new way of working in crises that will aim to not only meet humanitarian needs but also reduce them over time.

This commitment marks a breakthrough solution to the decades-old humanitarian and development divide that has hampered progress for millions of acutely vulnerable people caught up in protracted crises the world over. Stephen O’Brien, the UN’s Emergency Relief Coordinator said: “The humanitarian imperative extends all the way to reducing vulnerability and ending need.

This commitment for action is a bold new way of working for the development and humanitarian communities to work to deliver results to the most vulnerable people together.” Helen Clark, the UNDP Administrator, speaking on behalf of the UN Development System said: “Whether in preventing crises, or working to mitigate, recover and rebuild after devastation strikes, efforts to strengthen local institutions and services and strengthening local ownership in rebuilding and fast recovery, must be our shared aim, in both saving lives and ensuring progress”.

By signing on, agencies are committing to work together to meet needs, reduce vulnerabilities and manage crisis risks better, as called for in the Secretary-General’s ‘Agenda for Humanity’. By taking this Commitment to Action, UN agencies have taken a step towards delivering on the promise of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development to “leave no one behind” by putting the furthest behind at the forefront of their collective efforts.

The new way of working will involve operating over multi-year time frames and playing to the individual strengths of each agency involved to achieve collective outcomes for the most vulnerable people. This new approach is not about shifting development funding into humanitarian programmes or vice versa. Rather, it sets out to forge new partnerships, including with the private sector, multilateral development banks and national NGOs to both generate new resources and use existing resources more strategically.

To set in motion this new way of working, directly after the World Humanitarian Summit, agencies will share their data relating to vulnerability; undertake joint analysis of needs and response; and collaborate on planning and programming, backed up by financing and stronger leadership. The Deputy Secretary-General Jan Eliasson said: “our commitment today will include such action as pooled and combined data and analysis; joined-up planning and programming; and new financing modalities to support collective outcomes.”

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Signed on 23 May 2016 at the World Humanitarian Summit in Istanbul by:

Ban Ki-moon, Secretary-General of the United Nations
Margaret Chan, Director-General, World Health Organization
Helen Clark, Administrator, United Nations Development Programme
Ertharin Cousin, Executive Director, World Food Programme
Filippo Grandi, United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees
José Graziano da Silva, Director-General, Food and Agriculture Organization
Anthony Lake, Executive Director, United Nations Children’s Fund
Babatunde Osotimehin, Executive Director, United Nations Population Fund
Stephen O’Brien, Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator.

Endorsed by:
World Bank and the International Organization for Migration
For further information, please contact: Tomas de Mul on demul@un.org
Download more coverage here: WHSDPI2 Meetings Coverage – Day 2

UN Bhutan Country Results Report
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Bhutan has been a “Delivering as One” country since 2008 and this report contains the achievements made in support of the Royal Government of Bhutan’s ambitious development goals. It has been compiled in a manner that reflects key outcome areas identified by the UN: sustainable development; essential social services; gender equality and child protection; and […]

Published on:December 7, 2015

Bhutan has been a “Delivering as One” country since 2008 and this report contains the achievements made in support of the Royal Government of Bhutan’s ambitious development goals. It has been compiled in a manner that reflects key outcome areas identified by the UN: sustainable development; essential social services; gender equality and child protection; and good governance and participation. Lessons learned are also included within.

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Review of the Ethics and Integrity in Bhutan
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The review was conducted by UNDP Bangkok Regional Hub experts on request of Bhutan’s Anti-Corruption Commission. The purpose of the review was to identify gaps and provide recommendations for improvement, based on international good practices.

Published on:March 9, 2015

Review of the Ethics and Integrity in Bhutan (pdf, 2,6 MB)

Study of the Determinants of Voter’s Choice and Women’s Participation in Elective Offices in the Kingdom of Bhutan
ECB study 2014

This study examines the beliefs and trust in women and their leadership; perceptions of women as candidates and women as decision-makers; women’s roles and priorities within political party structures; and their effectiveness and interest in politics. The study was conducted by the Election Commission of Bhutan and supported by DIPD and UN Women.

Published on:January 12, 2015

Study of the Determinants of Voter’s Choice and Women’s Participation in Elective Offices (pdf, 5,2MB)

Millennium Development Goals Report 2014
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This UN report examines the latest progress towards achieving the MDGs.

Published on:September 24, 2014

Millennium Development Goals Report 2014 (pdf, 3,5MB)

Improving Women’s Participation in Local Governance
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This study is a joint effort of the Royal University of Bhutan (iGNHas) and the Norwegian Institute for Urban and Regional Research, supported by UN Women South-Asia Regional Office. It explores women’s experiences and perceptions about challenges and opportunities that influence the level of women’s participation.

Published on:September 22, 2014

Women in Local Governance (pdf, 5,1MB)

Youth and Migration (2013)
youth and migration

The World Youth Report 2013 – Youth and Migration – highlights some of the concerns, challenges and successes experienced by young migrants based on their own lives and told in their own voices. The report is published by the UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs.

Published on:September 17, 2014

Youth and Migration report (pdf, 5MB)

UNDP Bhutan Development in Action (May 2014)
UNDP Dev in Action

The second quarterly newsletter of UNDP Bhutan covers ongoing efforts and achievements in promoting gainful employment.

Published on:September 17, 2014

UNDP Development in Action May 2014 (pdf, 829 Kb)

Post-2015 National Consultations Report Bhutan (2013)
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“The Bhutanese Voice – The Future We Want for All: Well-being and Happiness” is the result of the national consultations held in Bhutan between February and April 2013. The consultations were conducted with technical and financial support of the UN in Bhutan in partnership with the GNHC, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and the Secretariat for the New Development Paradigm.

Published on:September 17, 2014

Post-2015 National Consultations Report Bhutan (pdf, 1MB)

UN Bhutan Country Results Report, 2015
2015 Results Report

The Royal Government of Bhutan and the United Nations Country Team (UNCT) have been key partners in the country’s development for more than 40 years. In 2008, Bhutan adopted on a voluntary basis the integrated approach known as Delivering as One. This global initiative increases the effectiveness and impact of UN support through more coherent […]

Published on:September 26, 2016

2015 Results Report

The Royal Government of Bhutan and the United Nations Country Team (UNCT) have been key partners in the country’s development for more than 40 years. In 2008, Bhutan adopted on a voluntary basis the integrated approach known as Delivering as One. This global initiative increases the effectiveness and impact of UN support through more coherent programmes and reduced costs for implementing partners.

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What we need from the Humanitarian Summit
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Stephen O’Brien, Under-Secretary-General and Emergency Relief Coordinator At the first ever World Humanitarian Summit in Istanbul, leaders from Governments, international agencies, the private sector and civil society will gather to announce their commitments to address some of the most critical challenges we face today. The needs for the Summit are clear: conflicts that know no […]

Published on:May 22, 2016

Stephen O’Brien, Under-Secretary-General and Emergency Relief Coordinator

The First Ever World Humanitarian Summit kicks off today.

The First Ever World Humanitarian Summit kicks off today.

At the first ever World Humanitarian Summit in Istanbul, leaders from Governments, international agencies, the private sector and civil society will gather to announce their commitments to address some of the most critical challenges we face today. The needs for the Summit are clear: conflicts that know no end causing untold suffering, mass displacement, and political and economic turmoil; flagrant violations of international humanitarian law; eye-watering levels of hunger and child malnutrition; more severe and more frequent natural disasters linked to climate change; and growing inequality that is cutting off millions from development progress.

The statistics are staggering: more than 130 million girls, boys, women and men are in need of access to humanitarian assistance and protection and the numbers keep on rising. Over 40.8 million people are displaced within their own country as a result of conflict and violence and a further 20.2 million people have sought refuge in other countries. In 2015 alone, 19.2 million people were displaced due to natural disasters in 113 countries.

Prioritizing the most vulnerable, the United Nations and its humanitarian partners are seeking almost US$21 billion to provide aid in 40 countries for the immediate life-saving needs and protection of 91 million people. Yet, almost half-way into the year, $17 billion of that vital $21 billion is still missing, denying our ability to assist people who in many cases have lost everything.

When UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon called for the first-ever World Humanitarian Summit four years ago he recognized that the status quo cannot continue. Now the vision and timing for such a gathering has never been more acute or relevant. World leaders, be they of States or NGOs, the UN and its Funds, Agencies and Programmes, the private sector, civil society and academia, must grapple with the reality of humanitarian needs spiralling out of control.

Coming together, we have this once in a generation opportunity to set in motion an ambitious agenda to change the way that we alleviate, and most importantly prevent, the suffering of the world’s most vulnerable people. To succeed, the Secretary-General in his ‘Agenda for Humanity’ calls for commitments and actions that focus on catalysing change in five areas: unleashing political will to prevent and resolve conflicts; stronger implementation of international humanitarian law and an end to impunity for perpetrators; ensuring that no one is left behind in striving for sustainable development, including the millions affected by crises; developing more diverse partnerships to reduce humanitarian need and build resilience; and investing in humanity by mobilizing new resources and improving efficiency and effectiveness in life-saving and protection humanitarian response.

To transform the lives of millions of people, one of the most critical shifts we need to see at the Summit is to redirect the international spotlight onto conflict prevention and resolution. As a start, political leaders must harness their combined determination and responsibility in recognizing that the only way we can reduce human suffering on such a protracted and massive scale is to do better to prevent and end conflict. This will require world leaders to significantly increase their investment in shoring up stability and giving proactive preventive diplomacy the primacy it deserves.

Leaders must also address violations of international humanitarian laws – laws that bind all States and non-state armed groups. In today’s conflict settings, international laws are violated with impunity: civilians killed in their homes and hospital beds or besieged to the point of starvation, and humanitarians and health care workers who try to help them targeted in illegal, often fatal, attacks. Moreover, all actors must recognize and respect the fundamental humanitarian principles of humanity, impartiality, neutrality and independence which are necessary to ensure safe, unimpeded humanitarian access to all people in need, whoever and wherever they are.

To bring on an era characterized by respect for international rules and norms, we will call on leaders to adopt a number of actions, including measures to prevent civilian harm; exerting their influence to ensure all people in need receive unimpeded and timely assistance; and to systematically condemn violations of international law and strengthen judicial solutions to hold perpetrators to account.

The Summit must also bring life to the commitment leaders have already made as part of the 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda, to leave no one behind and to start with those furthest behind first. We heed the call of people affected by crisis: they don’t just want to survive and be protected; they also want a chance to have hope and to thrive. While there will always be a need for principle-driven humanitarian assistance to save lives, wherever we can we need to address once and for all the root causes at the source and find better ways to reduce need and build resilience.

We must all commit to adopt a new way of working by forming inclusive partnerships with Governments, civil society, development and humanitarian actors and collectively establishing medium-term goals to reduce vulnerability.

Finally, none of these – and many other – changes will be possible unless we find smarter ways to finance and mobilize resources to not only alleviate suffering but reduce vulnerability and address risk. This will require us to diversify, as well as intensify, our funding base and adopt a more innovative set of tools, such as social safety nets, cash responses, disaster insurance, to protect people at risk. We must invest in people and in approaches with more flexible, multi-year funding, changing the way donors conceptualize and finance need at its very foundation.

These are just some of the calls for change that we will catalyse at the World Humanitarian Summit. We will also see the launch of dozens of ambitious and realizable initiatives, the scale and scope of which attest to the vibrancy and diversity of the humanitarian sector:

To stem the swelling number of displaced people, we will call on leaders to commit to halve the number of internally displaced people from 40 million in 2016 to 20 million by 2030, as well as to present policy, legal and financial solutions to improve the protection of refugees.

To reduce the human cost of disasters and protracted conflicts we will call on leaders to support a new ‘Global Preparedness Partnership’, which aims to achieve a minimum level of readiness for natural disasters in 20 countries by 2020. We will also seek far more investment from donors and partners in risk reduction before crises play out. We will launch the Connecting Business initiative, which will transform private sector engagement in disaster risk reduction, emergency preparedness, response and recovery at the local, national and regional levels. There will also be new partnerships on global health emergencies and urban crises.

To strengthen the safety, health and economic well-being of the world’s most vulnerable one billion people we will call on leaders to join the ‘One Billion Coalition for Resilience’.

And to deliver on the right to education for the 75 million children whose schooling has been interrupted by crisis, the UN Special Envoy for Global Education will launch an ambitious platform and fund for education in crises.

Over the past few decades, humanitarians have improved every aspect of humanitarian response: stronger analysis; better cooperation; more local and national capacity; and higher operational standards. Yet, building on the best we must never stop striving to improve, to become more effective and efficient at saving and protecting more lives.

As part of this determined drive, we will ask leaders across the humanitarian spectrum to sign on to a ‘Grand Bargain’ between donors and agencies to get more means into the hands of people who need them, by redirecting one billion dollars in efficiency savings to the front-line of humanitarian action over the next five years. In signing up to this bargain, aid agencies agree to improve the efficiency and accountability of the money we spend.

For our part, my office will significantly streamline its funding processes, we will lay greater stress on funding frontline local and national responders and we will support the new way of working and make the changes required to work across silos, among other changes.

We recognize that these changes will not always be comfortable or easy. They will involve disagreement and compromise. Last year through Sendai, through the climate change agreement and the 2030 Agenda, leaders showed that we can put the global good and affected people at the heart of our collaboration. The Summit presents a historic, ground-breaking opportunity and it is our moral responsibility as leaders to take action – the cost of not doing so, is too high.

That is why all leaders are now called upon to come to the Summit to make – and act on – commitments to support the Agenda for Humanity: to show the peoples of the world that we care and to share our common humanity. The millions of people affected by crisis the world over need us all – we owe it to ourselves to act; and those caught up in crisis deserve – and have a right to expect – nothing less from all of us in a position to do something about relieving their suffering. Join us!

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The first-ever World Humanitarian Summit is a global call to action by United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon. Held at the highest level, the Summit will bring the global community together to reaffirm our solidarity with people affected by crises, and our collective commitment to humanity.

@WHSummit https://impossiblechoices.org #sharehumanity http://www.worldhumanitariansummit.org/

Unemployed youth perception survey 2014
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This paper presents results and findings from a survey aimed at understanding perceptions among Bhutan’s unemployed youth. Its contents are primarily based on the Unemployed Youth Perception Survey conducted in April 2014 by the Ministry of Labour and Human Resources, Royal Government of Bhutan.

Published on:March 12, 2015

RGoB UNDP Youth Employment Report (pdf, 5.5MB)

Report on Legal Aid Symposium, 27-28 October 2014
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This report,prepared with support from the Bhutan National Legal Institute (BNLI), the Office of the Attorney General (OAG)
and UNDP Bhutan, comprises the proceedings of the symposium as well as specific follow up actions and way forward.

Published on:January 26, 2015

Legal Aid Symposium Report (pdf, 2MB)

UNDP Bhutan Annual Report 2012
undp 2012

Annual report 2012 focusing on UNDP Bhutan’s areas of work: green economy and disaster mitigation, inclusive and equitable development, and democratic governance.

Published on:September 24, 2014

UNDP Bhutan Annual Report (pdf, 1,4MB)

Everything You Always Wanted to Know About the UN
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Publication (2008) by the UN Department of Public Information for students at intermediate and secondary levels.

Published on:September 22, 2014

Everything You Always Wanted to Know About the UN (pdf, 4,8MB)

Bhutan One Programme 2014-2018 (2014)
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Bhutan One Programme is a single, coherent plan for all UN agencies in Bhutan. It outlines four outcomes and 23 measurable outputs which form the framework for all UN activities in Bhutan from 2014 to 2018.

Published on:September 17, 2014

Bhutan One Programme 2014-2018 (pdf, 3,5MB)

MAF: Youth Employment in Bhutan (2013)
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The MDG Acceleration Framework (MAF) report and Action Plan on youth unemployment, supported by the UN in Bhutan, provides national stakeholders with a systematic approach to identify and analyze bottlenecks that hinder timely MDG achievement.

Published on:September 17, 2014

MAF – Youth Employment in Bhutan 2013 (pdf, 2,2MB)

Bhutan Gender Equality Diagnostic of Selected Sectors (2014)
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The Gender Equality Diagnostic report looks at eight identified priority sectors and how to better mainstream gender in each of these sectors. The report was produced through a partnership of the Asian Development Bank (ADB) with the UN in Bhutan and the National Commission for Women and Children.

Published on:September 17, 2014

Bhutan Gender Equality Diagnostic report (pdf,  1,7MB)

Harmonized Approach to Cash Transfers Framework (2012)
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This reference manual was developed to provide guidelines and reference in one place for all issues related to HACT implementation in Bhutan. It is aimed at all Implementing Partners, such as government agencies and CSOs who receive UN support in Bhutan.

Published on:September 17, 2014

Bhutan HACT Reference Manual 2012 (pdf, 2.9MB)

 

 

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